Postprint available on Infoscience

I am regularly fighting to find articles, in particular in Transportation Research Record, a journal to which we don't have access from EPFL. I would like to avoid this to my potential readers.

I recently published an article in Transportation Research Part C: Emerging technologies. This publisher (Elsevier) is open access compliant according to Sherpa. It means that I can archive a post-print (i.e., final draft post-refereeing) (but not the publisher's version/PDF). There is no embargo, meaning that there is no delay for archiving after publication.

More specifically, in the contract I have with Transportation Research Part C, it is written that I keep "the right to use the Preprint or Accepted Author Manuscript for Personal Use, Internal Institutional Use and for Permitted Scholarly Posting".

The definition of an "Accepted Author Manuscript" is:

Author's version of the manuscript of an article that has been accepted for publication and which may include any author-incorporated changes suggested through the processes of submission processing, peer review, and editor-author communications. AAMs should not include other publisher value-added contributions such as copy-editing, formatting and (if relevant) pagination, and should include the Appropriate Bibliographic Citation and a link to the final publication (generally through the relevant DOI).

The definition of a "Permitted Scholarly Posting" is:

Voluntary posting of AAMs or Preprints by an author on open Web sites operated by the author or the author's institution for scholarly purposes, as determined by the author, or (in connection with Preprints ) on preprint servers, but not for Commercial Use or Systematic Distribution. The author should include the Appropriate Bibliographic Citation when posting AAMs. Deposit in or posting to subject-oriented or centralised repositories (such as PubMed Central), or institutional repositories with mandates for systematic postings, is permitted only under specific agreements between the publisher and the repository, agency or institution, and only consistent with the Copyright Owner's policies concerning such repositories. To learn more about the publisher's policies and agreements with such agencies or institutions go to http://www.elsevier.com/fundingbodyagreements.

The definition of "Appropriate Bibliographic Citation" is:

Authors posting Accepted Author Manuscript online should later add a citation for the Published Journal Article indicating that the Article was subsequently published, and may mention the journal title provided they add the following text at the beginning of the document:

NOTICE: this is the author's version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part C. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#

So I wrote an "Appropriate Bibliographic Citation" a the beginning of my "Accepted Author Manuscript" and I posted it. The postprint it is now available on Infoscience (direct link to PDF).

NOTICE: this is the author's version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part C. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be re ected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A denitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Volume 44, July 2014, Pages 146-170, ISSN 0968-090X, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2014.03.015.
This document has been generated on September 29, 2014

Posted by Antonin Danalet on Monday 29 September 2014 at 11:04
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